WHAT IS YOGA NIDRA?

Yoga Nidra (also known as Yogic Sleep) is a meditative practice that systematically relaxes the body + mind. It can be seen as a state between sleep + wakefulness.

It is an ancient practice with roots in Hinduism + tantric yoga. It was later developed by Swami Satyananda in Rishikesh in 1940s-50s.

Yoga Nidra has been shown to heal insomnia, anxiety, depression and generally release stress + long-held emotions.

It helps us tap into the unconscious mind and can be more restorative than a full nights sleep.

Yoga Nidra is practiced lying down so it is a highly accessible practice meant for every body.💛

DO YOU NEED TO BE FLEXIBLE TO DO YOGA?

A common misconception about yoga is that you have to be flexible.

Flexibility is a benefit of doing yoga, not a prerequisite. In fact, being very flexible can actually increase risk of injury, especially without the strength + body awareness to support the wide range of motion.

Yoga not only helps physical flexibility, it also helps open + expand mental boundaries. What presents as stiffness in the body is often related to unresolved tension + dis-ease in the mind. Yoga is much more than a physical practice or just exercise.


There are many ways to practice yoga and everyone can benefit no matter their current level of ‘flexibility.’

MEDITATION 101

Meditation has been a wonderful tool for my peace of mind, self-esteem and belief in my ability to create change. Here are 3 tips if you’re not sure where to start! Hope it helps you xo ✨

meditation.JPG


1️⃣DITCH THE RULES. You don’t have to sit on a cushion in a silk-lined, incense infused tranquility den to meditate! You can meditate in any position, any place, for any amount of time. You can do it in silence or with music. You can light incense or candles or both or neither. You can listen to a guided meditation or to your own breath. You can have your dog around to help you 🐶 If you have no idea where to start, just find a quiet place to sit. Inhale for 3 counts, then exhale for 3 counts. Repeat 5-10 times + you just meditated! The most important part is that you are taking time to be still + tune into you inner world. 


2️⃣EXPECT TO BE UNCOMFORTABLE. Meditation is a tool to clear through the stress + noise of everyday life, but before you get to the peace you have to sit with your thoughts and this can be very confronting. You may find that as soon as you sit still your mind conjures up 10 millions things to do or reminds you of an unresolved conflict from years past. You don’t have to fix your problems in one sitting - just notice what comes up. You may also get physically uncomfortable. Instead of fidgeting or scratching every itch, try staying in this discomfort. I’m amazed every time I sit down and instantly have an itch, but if I let it be and focus on my breath I forget about it quite quickly! Mind-body connection is powerful! 


3️⃣SET A STOPWATCH, NOT A TIMER. This is a tip I heard and it really resonated. When you set a timer, your mind goes to “how long til I’m done.” Setting a stopwatch gives you the space to stay in your meditation practice as long as it serves you. I’m often surprised at how quickly 10 or even 20 minutes goes by. (You can also just skip timing it altogether) 

SUPER SMOOTHIE

 
bluesmoothies.JPG

Most of the smoothies I make are totally random- blending whatever I have around. I'm not sure I've really ever made the same recipe twice!  Sometimes they turn out like green-brown sludge (yum, appetizing!)  and sometimes they come out in the most vibrant shades with delicious flavor.

These cuties above are my favorite color so I had to take a picture. I highly recommend playing around with smoothies and not being afraid to experiment and get creative... it's okay if not every recipe is a winner.

This smoothie was made with romaine, pineapple, hemp seeds, spirulina and almond milk. 

PLANT-BASED HOTSPOT: TEAISM

 
 LEFT: Vegan "Cheeseburger" with Broccoli in Sumac Vinaigrette. RIGHT: Green Gazpacho with Walnuts.  

LEFT: Vegan "Cheeseburger" with Broccoli in Sumac Vinaigrette. RIGHT: Green Gazpacho with Walnuts.  

A challenging part of eating plant-based can be finding restaurants that serve delicious healthy foods.

One of my favorite spots is Teaism, a Japanese tea house + restaurant with locations in Dupont Circle, Penn Quarter, and Lafayette Park. Their menu is not 100% plant-based but offers many great options ranging from simple yet flavorful Bento boxes to twists on American classics like their vegan "cheeseburger." They also have a beautiful selection of teas to pair with your food. The tranquil vibe of this spot makes it great for nice lunch with a friend or a chill dinner out. 

STRAWBERRY LIME SMOOTHIE WITH FRESH HERBS

strawberrymint.JPG

This was so necessary today !! ☀️☀️😓

Hydration is key for good health. Smoothies are a good way to sneak in more H2O as fruit is made mostly of water and smoothies are way more exciting to drink! This blend was amazingly refreshing - the perfection of summer strawberries layered with fresh herbs + the zest of fresh lime juice. 

  • 1 cup frozen strawberries (or fresh strawberries + ice to keep the drink frozen) 
  •  1/4 of a lime mint
  •  basil from my garden
  •  water

P.S. This would also make a great frozen cocktail if you have a little vodka (or tequila, rum, etc) laying around. It is Friday after all. And alcohol is made from plants. Just sayin'. 

BENEFITS OF PLANTS

 
benefitsofplants.JPG

The health benefits of eating more fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes and other plant foods are innumerable. Nutrient rich plant foods nourish every cell in your body, leading to wonderful results including: 

  • More Energy + Focus
  • Strong Bones, Hair + Nails
  • Low-Risk of Diabetes, Heart Disease + most other diseases
  • Improved Mental Health
  • Clear Skin
  • Improved Muscle Repair
  • High Quality Sleep

These are just a few of the many benefits of eating more plants. What are you eating today? 

E A T T H E R A I N B O W

 
RainbowPlate.JPG

 The colors in fruits + vegetables reflect what nutrients they contain. Eating a colorful diet ensures you're getting a wide variety of nutrients, each with powerful healing properties. 

 For example, many people know that carrots are good for eyesight. The orange color of carrots comes from beta-carotene, the nutrient that helps keep your vision sharp. Dark green vegetables like kale and broccoli are the most nutrient dense and are excellent for detoxifying and reducing inflammation. 

I love this concept because rather than memorizing every nutrient in every food, you can focus on creating beautiful, colorful meals, knowing that good nutrition comes naturally. 

SPRINGTIME PESTO (6 INGREDIENTS)

 
PestoIngredients.JPG
PestoPasta.JPG

Springtime Pesto with peas, cashews + avocado. Super nutritious and easy peasy to make! Cashews + avocado make this pesto rich + creamy without any dairy or oil. Peas give an extra boost of fiber - who knew sauces could count as a serving of vegetables!?  Just 6 ingredients + a blender needed. Perfect for quick spring/summer meals. 💚🌱
.
Recipe:

  • 1/4 avocado
  • 1/2 cup basil -1/2 cup peas
  • 1/3 cup cashews
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 2 cloves garlic
  •  Salt + pepper to taste

Optional: add nutritional yeast

Add all ingredients in blender or food processor. Blend until smooth (30-60seconds). Perfect for pasta, roasted vegetables, sandwiches, zucchini noodles and more. 

FATHER'S DAY PIZZA

One of the most fun parts about plant-based eating has been sharing and cooking up new recipes with my family. This year for Father's Day we made homemade pizzas - one with marinara + roasted veggies, a margherita with basil, tomato and cashew cheese, and this beauty pictured below with sauteed mushrooms, pesto, arugula and cashew cheese. The recipe is inspired from one of my favorite food bloggers, Erin Ireland. Making your own pizzas is a great way to get the family involved in cooking together. 

pizza.JPG

EAT WHAT ELEPHANTS EAT ✌🏽

There is SO much wrong in the meat + dairy industry. Deeply capitalistic and violent in nature, food production is linked to almost every other social issue we face today. | Meat consumption is unsustainable for a growing population and deeply connected to lack of good food and nutritionin certain communities.

FullSizeRender.jpg

Animal products have a well documented connection to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, mental illnesses and pretty much all other diseases. | Millions if not billions of animals are killed each year to satisfy our appetite for meat after a life of being forced to have sex to produce milk and eggs | Meat and dairy are classified as carcinogens. Those who work in meat production both in slaughterhouses, factories and kitchens are harmed the most by the industry. They are often very poor,undocumented, or otherwise held back from speaking up about severely harmful working conditions. | Let you food choices speak for animals. Let your food choices speak for fair labor practices. Let your food choices support mental and physical health for everyone. It doesn't have to be all or nothing ! We can all do something ! 

cOcOnuT bAnaNa beRRy bLiSS bOwL ~~

This smoothie bowl was soo creamy + dreamy I couldn't get enough!! A touch of full-fat coconut milk gives this smoothie amazing taste + texture that is somehow so light + so rich at the same time. I'm still dreaming about it.  I hope you enjoy xo 

  • 2 frozen bananas
  • 1 cup strawberries
  • handful blueberries
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk 

Top with whatever makes ya feel good. I have more banana +  strawberries, drizzle of coconut milk, cacaonibs, granola, goji berries + coconut flakes. 

 

Q + A TUESDAY | WHAT ARE 'GOOD' AND 'BAD' FATS?

Fat is a macronutrient (along with protein + carbs) that we need to be healthy. Fat is a slow burning fuel for the body. Unlike carbs, which are quickly converted to and used as energy, fats take longer to break down and act as a reserve source of energy.  Fat helps the body absorb nutrients such as vitamins A, D, E, and K. It helps regulate hormones and provides a layer of protection for our cells and internal organs.

 Avocado on walnut bread with olive oil and crushed pistachio.  

Avocado on walnut bread with olive oil and crushed pistachio.  

Fat is an important part of a healthy diet, but some fats are nourishing to the body, while others are linked to conditions like diabetes, high cholesterol + heart disease.

‘GOOD’- UNSATURATED FAT

Unsaturated fat is found in plant-based foods like nuts and seeds, plant oils, and avocado. Unsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature (think of olive oil.) Unsaturated fat helps to raise good cholesterol levels and can prevent or treat a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There are two types of unsaturated fats:

  1. Monounsaturated

  2. Polyunsaturated

Monounsaturated are considered most beneficial for lowering cholesterol, regulating insulin, and preventing disease, but both offer health benefits for the whole body. While these types of fats have many health benefits, it’s important to consume them mindfully as portion sizes are relatively small and add up quickly.

‘BAD’ - SATURATED OR TRANS FAT

Saturated fats are found in animal products (meat and dairy) as well as in coconut and palm oil. Saturated fats are generally solid at room temperature (think butter).  Saturated fats are known to elevate cholesterol levels + cause clogged arteries, which can lead to stroke and heart attack.

Trans fats are formed through food processing when hydrogen is added to plant oils to make them solid. Trans fats are found in processed foods like cookies, donuts, biscuits, and margarine. These are the worst fats for your health and should be avoided at all costs.

 

Compared to carbohydrates, fat from foods is very easily stored as fat in the body. Fat is the most calorically dense macronutrient, so it’s important to consume both types of fat in moderation (with ideally no animal product intake). Plant-based fat is crucial, and nothing to be afraid of, but it’s important to note that serving sizes are small

I hope you’ve learned something from the past few articles covering the 3 macronutrients (fat, carbs + protein). I believe everyone can benefit from learning more about how their bodies work and how to keep them healthy. Send me any questions you have and I will give you an answer! 

Q+A TUESDAY | DO CARBS MAKE YOU FAT?

 

For many people who want to lose weight, one of the first things they try to do is go ‘low-carb.’ The idea that bread + pasta make us fat is treated as common knowledge, but the truth is that carbs are the number one things you can eat for health and weight loss.

 All these foods have carbs!

All these foods have carbs!

CARBS 101

First it’s important to understand what a carb is. Most people think carbs are just pasta and bread, but they actually include a much broader range of food.

A carbohydrate is a macronutrient, just like fat + protein. Carbohydrates are large molecules made of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen, which can also be referred to as ‘saccharides,’  coming from 'saccharum' sugar in Latin.

There are both simple and complex carbs. The most simple carb is called a monosaccharide (mono=1 → 1 sugar). Monosaccharides are the building blocks for more complex carbs, each named for the number of monosaccharide molecules they contain- disaccharides (2) , oligosaccharides (3-9), and polysaccharides (10+).

 DIAGRAM FROM http://haniazwan.weebly.com/carbohydrate

DIAGRAM FROM http://haniazwan.weebly.com/carbohydrate


SIMPLE CARBS

Monosaccharides and disaccharides are considered simple carbs and are quickly digested by the body.

Examples of monosaccharides are glucose + fructose. Glucose is the most simple unit of carbohydrates and can’t be broken down any further in the body. It is the body’s preferred energy source and the only energy source for the brain.

An example of a disaccharide is table sugar or sucrose, made from glucose + fructose. Sucrose is found in soda, candy, cakes and other refined sweets. All these products add a lot of calories to your daily intake without actually adding any nutritional value. You can end up filling up on foods with no nutritional benefit to your body and find yourself hungry an hour later still craving sugary, processed foods. Frequently consuming these sweets also may prevent you from eating healthier, more nutrient dense foods throughout the day. Fruits are also disaccharides, but their fiber and nutrient content help buffer the quick absorption of glucose into the body.

Simple carbs will give an immediate energy boost through this influx of glucose into the system. This will cause a spike in blood sugar, followed by a release of insulin, a hormone that helps metabolize & store glucose, and a subsequent blood sugar crash. This crash makes the body feel tired and desperate for energy, leading to more cravings + in many cases overeating.


COMPLEX CARBS

On the other hand, complex carbs (all fruits and vegetables, plus starches like potatoes) take time for the body to break down so blood sugar levels remain stable and the body stays satiated for hours after eating. Plant-based carbs are the best thing you can eat to fuel your body, maintain energy levels, and ensure you’re eating a wide range of nutrients. All plant foods contain carbs, so they play a big role in a plant based diet. Many people struggle when they try to eat plant-based because they don’t realize the importance of eating high quality carbs throughout the day and end up hungry and fatigued.

To make sure you’re eating enough of the right type of carbs, the majority of your diet (by volume, not calories) should be fruits and vegetables, with servings of whole grains like quinoa, oats, brown rice eaten throughout the day. When you do feel hungry, try eating a plant-based carb before reaching for a tempting snack.  Pairing fruits (especially sweet fruits like banana) with complex carbs also helps to maintain blood sugar levels. For example adding lots of leafy greens to your smoothie, or eating oatmeal with fruit for breakfast.

WHOLE VS. REFINED GRAINS

There are also whole and refined grains. Grains like wheat and rice make up the foods we typically consider carbs, so this is an important distinction.  Whole means the grains are in their natural form- for example, brown rice is a whole grain because the grain of rice is eaten as it’s grown and harvested. White rice is a refined grain is made by removing the hard outer shell from the rice grain. This creates a softer texture and helps the food keep longer, but it also strips away all the vital nutrients (like fiber) that make grains good for you. Basically, refined grains come from the same source as whole carbs, but have been stripped of many their nutritional benefits. This doesn’t mean white pasta or white rice is 100% bad- it can still help you fill up and contains some nutritional benefit, but it must be eaten in moderation or with complex carbs & whole grains to stay balanced.

THE BOTTOM LINE

So to answer our question- some carbs do make you fat. Simple + refined carbs send blood sugar + hormone levels up and down, leading to energy crashes, cravings, and overconsumption of unhealthy foods. However, all plant foods are also carbs and are the absolute best foods we can be fueling our bodies with. The trick is filling up on the good carbs to keep energy, hunger and hormone levels in check so we can enjoy all our favorite foods in a way that keeps us feeling good.

SwEeT ~n~ SpiCy

Spices like turmeric, black pepper and cinnamon have powerful healing properties, perfect for boosting the immune system as the weather changes. Each is rich in antioxidants that reduce inflammation and prevent diseases like cancer and heart disease. Reducing inflammation is key for maintaining all around health + balance in the body. 

IMG_6340.JPG

RECIPE

1 banana

1 cup almond milk

1 tbsp turmeric

2 tsp cinnamon

2 tsp black pepper

1 tsp vanilla

Q + A TUESDAY: WHERE DO VEGANS GET PROTEIN?

 

Welcome to Q+A Tuesday, a new series on my blog to answer the nutrition, yoga + wellness questions I get asked most often. There is so much to know when it comes to these topics, so my hope is to break things down and give you a foundation of information to help you feel confident and clear about how to make healthy choices. There is ALWAYS more to know, so this is a really great way for me to learn as well.  If you have any questions you want me to answer, let me know and I will definitely give you an answer. 

IMG_5976.JPG

WHERE DO VEGANS GET PROTEIN?

This is probably the most common question I get asked when I talk to people about eating a plant-based diet. Most of us don’t know a lot about what nutrients are in our food, yet nearly everyone has been taught their whole life to put protein on a pedestal- without really knowing what it is. The glorification of protein is largely a part of a highly successful campaign to encourage the consumption of meat and dairy. Despite popular belief, it is possible to get plenty of protein on a plant-based diet, and without all the negative side effects of animal products.  So let’s start at the beginning.

What is protein?

Protein is a macronutrient (along with fat and carbohydrates) made up of amino acids strung together. Some amino acids are produced naturally by our bodies (non-essential amino acids) while some we need to ingest through food (essential amino acids). There are 20 amino acids in total which combine to make a variety of different types of protein.

Why do we need it?

Protein is used by every cell in our body and plays many important roles. It is the major building block of muscle and tissue and is used to produces hormones and enzymes used throughout the body, which affect everything from mood to brain function to heart health.

How much do we need?

A rule of thumbis to eat .8g of protein for every kilogram of body weight. To find your weight in kilograms, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.

So, if you weigh 150 pounds:

150lbs/2.2 = 68.18kg → 68.18kg x 0.8g = 54g protein/day

Athletes and those who exercise frequentlycan round up to 1g of protein per kilogram of body weight.

150lbs/2.2= 68kg → 68.18kg x 1g = 68g protein/day

It’s not necessarily important to measure how much protein you’re eating unless you just happen to be curious. It’s important to note that our bodies cannot storeor use extra protein, so there is little benefit to piling on the protein and potential risks including nutrient deficiencies, kidney problems, and weight gain as a result of the body storing excess protein as fat.

Which is better: animal or plant-based protein?

Animal protein is often promoted as superior because it is a ‘complete’ protein, meaning it contains the full range of amino acids needed by our body. In reality, there is no significance to the ‘completeness’ of the protein we consume. Our bodies are able to take amino acids from a variety of plant-based and assemble them into different proteins as needed. Our bodies are experts at giving us just what we need, so the surest thing to do is eat a wide range of nourishing plant foods and let the body take care of the rest.

Another apparent benefit is that you get more protein by volume with animal foods, a draw for those who feel they need to eat as much protein as possible. This issue with this is that focusing in on protein rich foods without considering other nutrients or looking at the diet as a whole leads to misguided food choices.

Let’s break it down….

  • A 4oz hamburger patty contains 20g of protein, 182 calories, 13g of fat including 6g of saturated fat (the “bad” kind of fat- more on this another day), a good amount of Vitamin B12 and negligible amounts of other nutrients.
  • To get the same amount of protein from kale, you would need to eat 8 cups of cooked kale, which would come to 290 calories, with just 4g of fat, 21 grams of fiber, 75% daily value of calcium,  and over 100% daily value of iron, manganese, and vitamins A, C and K.

Now I’m in no way suggesting you eat this much kale in a day!!! The point is just that if you focus only on protein-rich foods, you often end up eating too much of foods that are low in nutrients and high saturated fat, while ignoring other nourishing foods that are key to good health.

This also illustrates that you can literally eat an insane amount of fruits and vegetables and not gain weight because they are so low in fat, calories and protein.

One last way to drive this point home is to compare a day of food for a typical meat-eater vs. a vegan.

MEAT EATER

  • BREAKFAST: 2 EGGS, 2 SLICES TURKEY BACON, 1 PIECE TOAST, 1 SLICE CHEDDAR CHEESE, 1 ORANGE
  • LUNCH: ROMAINE SALAD WITH CUCUMBER + 4OZ GRILLED CHICKEN BREAST
  • SNACKS: ¼ CUP ALMONDS, 1 BANANA, 1 POWER BAR
  • DINNER: 4 OZ GRILLED SALMON, 1 CUP BROWN RICE, 3 CUPS RAW SPINACH, SAUTEED
  • DESSERT: ½ CUP CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

NUTRITION BREAKDOWN:

  • CALORIES: 2000
  • PROTEIN: 142g
  • FIBER: 28g
  • FAT: 75g (25g saturated) 
  • CHOLESTEROL: 635mg

VEGAN

  • BREAKFAST: 2 SLICES TOAST WITH ½ AN AVOCADO, ½ CUP BLACK BEANS, 1 ORANGE
  • LUNCH: PROTEIN SALAD (FROM RECIPE) WITH ONE SLICE BREAD
  • SNACKS: 2 BANANAS, 1 CUP CARROTS WITH 3 TBSP HUMMUS, 3 DARK CHOCOLATE SQUARES
  • DINNER: 1.5 CUPS PASTA WITH ONIONS, TOMATO SAUCE, BREAD, 1.5 CUPS SAUTEED BROCCOLI
  • DESSERT: ½ CUP COCONUT MILK ICE CREAM

NUTRITION BREAKDOWN

  • CALORIES:2000
  • PROTEIN: 70g
  • FIBER: 79g
  • FAT: 68g (16g saturated)
  • CHOLESTEROL: 0.3mg

Note that neither of these are meant to be prime examples of a good diet, but rather a typical diet that the average person eats. As you can see, protein adds up fast, and honestly this is a pretty moderate example of a meat eaters diet. Even the plant-based diet exceeded my protein requirement calculated above. The science behind nutrition is quite complicated, but the takeaway is that singling out protein as a superior nutrient has unintended consequences. Our obsession with making sure we get enough has led many to over consume animal products, and with them soaring levels of saturated fat & cholesterol without the fiber, vitamins, and nutrients to balance it out.

If all this sounds like a lot, don’t stress. My main point here is that the only thing you need to do to ensure you’re getting all the nutrients you need is to eat a variety of plant based foods and trust your body.  (Protein Salad recipe and a list of protein rich plant foods below)  If you’re curious to know more about the nutrition in your diet, check out chronometer.com or nutritionfacts.org.  Any questions you have about this article, please ask me!!!!! I want to learn and share as much with you as I can. Xo

PROTEIN RICH PLANT FOODS

  • BEANS (BLACK, PINTO, ANYTHING!)
  • CHICK PEAS
  • TOFU
  • NUTS (ALMONDS, CASHEWS, WALNUTS ETC.)
  • SEEDS (CHIA, FLAX, HEMP ETC.)
  • LEAFY GREENS (KALE, SPINACH)
  • AVOCADO
  • TEMPEH
  • EDAMAME
  • WHOLE WHEAT PASTA
  • BREAD 
  • NUT BUTTERS 
  • LENTILS
  • QUINOA 
  • RICE 
  • NUT MILKS
  • BANANAS
  • HUMMUS

PROTEIN SALAD

  • CALORIES: 401
  • PROTEIN: 20g
  • FIBER: 14g
  • FAT: 25g (unsaturated)

Great source of calcium, magnesium, Vitamins A, K, & C, iron, and much more.

  1. 2 CUPS KALE
  2. ½ CUP EDAMAME (FRESH OR FROZEN)
  3. ½ CUP CARROTS
  4. ½ CUP TOMATOES
  5. ½ CUP BELL PEPPERS
  6. ¼ CUP SLIVERED ALMONDS
  7. 1 TBSP FLAX SEEDS
  8. 2 TBSP HAMPTON CREEK JUST CAESAR (FAVE VEGAN CONDIMENT BRAND!!)

Chop veggies to desired size and mix with Caesar dressing. Warm edamame if using frozen. Sprinkle with almonds and flax seeds. 

zuCChiNi NooDleS wiTh 'cReaMy' AvoCaDo pEsTo ~

This is the most delicious, easiest thing to make.  Avocado is the best for making things creamy without any dairy or heavy oils. Try this today xo 

Pesto

  • ½ an avocado

  • ¾ cup basil

  • 1 cup spinach

  • 2 cloves garlic

  • ¼ cup pine nuts

  • salt + pepper to taste

Zucchini Noodles

  • 3+ green or yellow zucchini, raw

Cut the end off 3 zucchini and use a spiralizer to make your noodles! Mix in your pesto and add diced tomatoes for a healthy meal in 15 minutes.

BaNaNaS ~~~

Sunday's are for freezing all the ripe bananas so I can have smoothies all week. Planning ahead is an important part of eating well. When you have good, healthy food around to eat- you will eat it! Bananas help you feel full, are great fuel for exercise, and are a good source of fiber, potassium, vitamin C and several antioxidants.  🐒🐵🍌🍌👌

IMG_6013.JPG