Q + A TUESDAY: WHERE DO VEGANS GET PROTEIN?

 

Welcome to Q+A Tuesday, a new series on my blog to answer the nutrition, yoga + wellness questions I get asked most often. There is so much to know when it comes to these topics, so my hope is to break things down and give you a foundation of information to help you feel confident and clear about how to make healthy choices. There is ALWAYS more to know, so this is a really great way for me to learn as well.  If you have any questions you want me to answer, let me know and I will definitely give you an answer. 

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WHERE DO VEGANS GET PROTEIN?

This is probably the most common question I get asked when I talk to people about eating a plant-based diet. Most of us don’t know a lot about what nutrients are in our food, yet nearly everyone has been taught their whole life to put protein on a pedestal- without really knowing what it is. The glorification of protein is largely a part of a highly successful campaign to encourage the consumption of meat and dairy. Despite popular belief, it is possible to get plenty of protein on a plant-based diet, and without all the negative side effects of animal products.  So let’s start at the beginning.

What is protein?

Protein is a macronutrient (along with fat and carbohydrates) made up of amino acids strung together. Some amino acids are produced naturally by our bodies (non-essential amino acids) while some we need to ingest through food (essential amino acids). There are 20 amino acids in total which combine to make a variety of different types of protein.

Why do we need it?

Protein is used by every cell in our body and plays many important roles. It is the major building block of muscle and tissue and is used to produces hormones and enzymes used throughout the body, which affect everything from mood to brain function to heart health.

How much do we need?

A rule of thumbis to eat .8g of protein for every kilogram of body weight. To find your weight in kilograms, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2.

So, if you weigh 150 pounds:

150lbs/2.2 = 68.18kg → 68.18kg x 0.8g = 54g protein/day

Athletes and those who exercise frequentlycan round up to 1g of protein per kilogram of body weight.

150lbs/2.2= 68kg → 68.18kg x 1g = 68g protein/day

It’s not necessarily important to measure how much protein you’re eating unless you just happen to be curious. It’s important to note that our bodies cannot storeor use extra protein, so there is little benefit to piling on the protein and potential risks including nutrient deficiencies, kidney problems, and weight gain as a result of the body storing excess protein as fat.

Which is better: animal or plant-based protein?

Animal protein is often promoted as superior because it is a ‘complete’ protein, meaning it contains the full range of amino acids needed by our body. In reality, there is no significance to the ‘completeness’ of the protein we consume. Our bodies are able to take amino acids from a variety of plant-based and assemble them into different proteins as needed. Our bodies are experts at giving us just what we need, so the surest thing to do is eat a wide range of nourishing plant foods and let the body take care of the rest.

Another apparent benefit is that you get more protein by volume with animal foods, a draw for those who feel they need to eat as much protein as possible. This issue with this is that focusing in on protein rich foods without considering other nutrients or looking at the diet as a whole leads to misguided food choices.

Let’s break it down….

  • A 4oz hamburger patty contains 20g of protein, 182 calories, 13g of fat including 6g of saturated fat (the “bad” kind of fat- more on this another day), a good amount of Vitamin B12 and negligible amounts of other nutrients.
  • To get the same amount of protein from kale, you would need to eat 8 cups of cooked kale, which would come to 290 calories, with just 4g of fat, 21 grams of fiber, 75% daily value of calcium,  and over 100% daily value of iron, manganese, and vitamins A, C and K.

Now I’m in no way suggesting you eat this much kale in a day!!! The point is just that if you focus only on protein-rich foods, you often end up eating too much of foods that are low in nutrients and high saturated fat, while ignoring other nourishing foods that are key to good health.

This also illustrates that you can literally eat an insane amount of fruits and vegetables and not gain weight because they are so low in fat, calories and protein.

One last way to drive this point home is to compare a day of food for a typical meat-eater vs. a vegan.

MEAT EATER

  • BREAKFAST: 2 EGGS, 2 SLICES TURKEY BACON, 1 PIECE TOAST, 1 SLICE CHEDDAR CHEESE, 1 ORANGE
  • LUNCH: ROMAINE SALAD WITH CUCUMBER + 4OZ GRILLED CHICKEN BREAST
  • SNACKS: ¼ CUP ALMONDS, 1 BANANA, 1 POWER BAR
  • DINNER: 4 OZ GRILLED SALMON, 1 CUP BROWN RICE, 3 CUPS RAW SPINACH, SAUTEED
  • DESSERT: ½ CUP CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM

NUTRITION BREAKDOWN:

  • CALORIES: 2000
  • PROTEIN: 142g
  • FIBER: 28g
  • FAT: 75g (25g saturated) 
  • CHOLESTEROL: 635mg

VEGAN

  • BREAKFAST: 2 SLICES TOAST WITH ½ AN AVOCADO, ½ CUP BLACK BEANS, 1 ORANGE
  • LUNCH: PROTEIN SALAD (FROM RECIPE) WITH ONE SLICE BREAD
  • SNACKS: 2 BANANAS, 1 CUP CARROTS WITH 3 TBSP HUMMUS, 3 DARK CHOCOLATE SQUARES
  • DINNER: 1.5 CUPS PASTA WITH ONIONS, TOMATO SAUCE, BREAD, 1.5 CUPS SAUTEED BROCCOLI
  • DESSERT: ½ CUP COCONUT MILK ICE CREAM

NUTRITION BREAKDOWN

  • CALORIES:2000
  • PROTEIN: 70g
  • FIBER: 79g
  • FAT: 68g (16g saturated)
  • CHOLESTEROL: 0.3mg

Note that neither of these are meant to be prime examples of a good diet, but rather a typical diet that the average person eats. As you can see, protein adds up fast, and honestly this is a pretty moderate example of a meat eaters diet. Even the plant-based diet exceeded my protein requirement calculated above. The science behind nutrition is quite complicated, but the takeaway is that singling out protein as a superior nutrient has unintended consequences. Our obsession with making sure we get enough has led many to over consume animal products, and with them soaring levels of saturated fat & cholesterol without the fiber, vitamins, and nutrients to balance it out.

If all this sounds like a lot, don’t stress. My main point here is that the only thing you need to do to ensure you’re getting all the nutrients you need is to eat a variety of plant based foods and trust your body.  (Protein Salad recipe and a list of protein rich plant foods below)  If you’re curious to know more about the nutrition in your diet, check out chronometer.com or nutritionfacts.org.  Any questions you have about this article, please ask me!!!!! I want to learn and share as much with you as I can. Xo

PROTEIN RICH PLANT FOODS

  • BEANS (BLACK, PINTO, ANYTHING!)
  • CHICK PEAS
  • TOFU
  • NUTS (ALMONDS, CASHEWS, WALNUTS ETC.)
  • SEEDS (CHIA, FLAX, HEMP ETC.)
  • LEAFY GREENS (KALE, SPINACH)
  • AVOCADO
  • TEMPEH
  • EDAMAME
  • WHOLE WHEAT PASTA
  • BREAD 
  • NUT BUTTERS 
  • LENTILS
  • QUINOA 
  • RICE 
  • NUT MILKS
  • BANANAS
  • HUMMUS

PROTEIN SALAD

  • CALORIES: 401
  • PROTEIN: 20g
  • FIBER: 14g
  • FAT: 25g (unsaturated)

Great source of calcium, magnesium, Vitamins A, K, & C, iron, and much more.

  1. 2 CUPS KALE
  2. ½ CUP EDAMAME (FRESH OR FROZEN)
  3. ½ CUP CARROTS
  4. ½ CUP TOMATOES
  5. ½ CUP BELL PEPPERS
  6. ¼ CUP SLIVERED ALMONDS
  7. 1 TBSP FLAX SEEDS
  8. 2 TBSP HAMPTON CREEK JUST CAESAR (FAVE VEGAN CONDIMENT BRAND!!)

Chop veggies to desired size and mix with Caesar dressing. Warm edamame if using frozen. Sprinkle with almonds and flax seeds.